Tag: Wealth

February 20, 2018


Tax Foundation – State Corporate Income Tax Rates for 2018 – Morgan Scarboro 2/7

Visual Capitalist – Mapping the World’s Wealthiest Cities – Jeff Desjardins 2/16

WSJ – Daily Shot: Credit Suisse – Timeline of Relative Market Capitalizations Since 1900 2/16

WSJ – Daily Shot: TRACE – NRA Contributions to select political candidates 2/15

Worthy Insights / Opinion Pieces / Advice

University of Oxford – Stranded Property Assets in China’s Resource-based Cities: implications for financial stability? – Gerard Dericks, Robert Potts, & Ben Caldecott February 2018

The Atlantic – The Plot Against America – Franklin Foer – March 2018

  • In depth profile on Paul Manafort.

The Atlantic – How WeWork Has Perfectly Captured the Millennial Id – Laura Bliss – March 2018

  • “The company sells a somewhat uneasy combination of capitalist ambition and cooperative warmth.”

WSJ – Growth Is the Missing Ingredient for Kraft Heinz – Aaron Back 2/16

Markets / Economy

FT – Food industry giants struggle to keep up with changing tastes – Anna Nicolaou 2/16

  • “Sales woes at Kraft Heinz, Danone and others force groups to cut costs and eye deals.”

Real Estate

CoStar – Oaktree Becomes Latest Investment Manager to Launch Non-Traded REIT, Looking to Raise up to $2 Billion – Mark Heschmeyer 2/16

  • “Oaktree joins a growing list of major investment firms to expand into non-traded REIT fundraising. The Blackstone Group kicked off the trend in September 2016. So far, other big investors that have followed its lead into the non-traded REIT sector include Nuveen’s TH Real Estate, BGC Partners’ Cantor Fitzgerald, Starwood Capital Group, KKR & Co., and TPG Capital.”

WSJ – New York’s Commercial Property Slump Shows Signs of Slowing – Keiko Morris 2/11


Bloomberg – Hedge Fund Startups in Asia See Signs of Revival – Bei Hu and Klaus Wille 1/21

WSJ – The Rise of Private Assets Is Built on a Mountain of New Debt – Paul J. Davies 2/15


WSJ – Daily Shot: Bitcoin 2/15


FT – SpaceX joins race to make web truly worldwide – Richard Waters 2/15

  • “SpaceX will on Saturday officially enter the race to bring internet access to all parts of the earth’s surface with the planned launch of its first test satellites for a globe-encompassing communications network.”
  • “The latest trial from Elon Musk’s private space company is a world away from last week’s spectacular first launch of Falcon Heavy, the world’s biggest rocket. Undertaken with none of the Tesla chief executive’s usual showman flair — he has not even mentioned it on Twitter — it is an early technical trial for a communications service that could be years from completion.”
  • “If successful, however, SpaceX has said it plans to start launching its first commercial satellites next year, with a constellation of more than 11,000 circling the earth in low-earth orbit by the time the network is complete in 2024.”
  • “SpaceX’s application for approval to test a satellite internet service from the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is one of 12 made to the US regulators, highlighting the extent of the potential competition.”
  • “SpaceX plans to connect its constellation of satellites to form a so-called mesh network, passing information among them and blanketing the earth.”

Health / Medicine

FT – Good bacteria can help brain function better – Clive Cookson 2/15

  • “Researchers are discovering remarkable new links between gut bacteria and the brain. Problems from poor sleep to memory loss could be helped by manipulating the microbiome, the trillions of bacteria living inside healthy human bodies, the American Association for the Advancement of Science heard on Thursday.”


January 29, 2018


BLS – TED: The Economics Daily – Union Membership Rates in each State, 2017 1/25

  • “New York continued to have the highest union membership rate (23.8%), while South Carolina continued to have the lowest (2.6%).”

statista – The Countries Most Optimistic About 2018 – Niall McCarthy 1/22

Visual Capitalist – Visualizing a Global Shift in Wealth Over 10 Years – Jeff Desjardins 1/26

WSJ – Daily Shot: US Upward Mobility 1/26

Worthy Insights / Opinion Pieces / Advice

A Wealth of Common Sense – Some Lessons For Living From Older Generations – Ben Carlson 1/25

Project Syndicate – Blockchain’s Broken Promises – Nouriel Roubini 1/26

WSJ – My 10-Year Odyssey Through America’s Housing Crisis – Ryan Dezember 1/26

Markets / Economy

Bloomberg – Worthless Auto Trade-Ins Signal Riskier Loans – Claire Boston 1/25

  • “A growing share of the trade-ins that U.S. auto dealers and lenders accept for car-purchase financing are worthless on paper, a sign that banks and finance companies are making riskier loans to keep up revenue as vehicle sales slow.”
  • “Almost a third of cars traded in last year were worth less than the loans that had been financing them, according to car-shopping website Edmunds. That’s up from about a quarter a decade earlier, said Edmunds, which looked at cars traded in as part of financing packages for new auto purchases in the U.S.”
  • “Underwater trade-ins are just one example of the greater risks that lenders are taking now. New vehicle sales fell 1.8% to 17.2 million in 2017, but lending volume for new and used car purchases was on track to be higher than ever, according to data from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and consumer credit bureau Experian. The growth in the average amount financed for a new car outpaced median income growth between 2013 and 2016, Moody’s said, suggesting borrowers are getting more strained.”
  • “Any pain from car-loan trouble will likely be just a shadow of the housing bubble collapse, because the auto debt market is much smaller. There were around $9 trillion of mortgages outstanding at the end of the third quarter, compared with $1.2 trillion of auto debt, the New York Fed said. And so far, many of the bonds backed by subprime auto loans are performing well thanks to built-in protections for investors. Wells Fargo analysts said in a note Wednesday that bonds issued by two of the biggest subprime auto lenders — Santander Consumer USA Holdings Inc. and General Motors Co.’s finance arm — have room to reach prices not seen since before the financial crisis.”
  • “The higher percentage of underwater loans on trade-ins may be a sign that car owners are trading in their vehicles sooner than they had previously. A consumer is often the most underwater on his or her auto loan in the first few years of ownership, because the value of the vehicle drops fastest over that time.”
  • “For borrowers who do trade in their underwater cars, lenders are essentially giving them the money to pay down their loan. The dealer sells the used car, and whatever balance remains on the old loan is folded into the new loan. The borrower might get a longer-term loan than he or she had before to help keep monthly payments manageable.”

Real Estate

Commercial Property Executive – REIT Gets SEC OK for St. Regis Aspen Resort IPO – Gail Kalinoski 1/26

  • “Aspen REIT Inc. has been given approval by the Securities and Exchange Commission for a $33.5 million initial public offering allowing investors to buy shares in the luxury St. Regis Aspen Resort in Colorado.”
  • “Upon closing of the IPO, Aspen REIT will be the first single-asset REIT to list on a national securities exchange in the U.S., according to the company.”
  • “Aspen REIT is offering 1,675,000 shares at $20 per share in the Regulation A+ IPO. The REIT applied to list its common stock on the NYSE American stock exchange under the ticker symbol AJAX. Aspen REIT intends to use substantially all of the net proceeds from the IPO, together with equity in Aspen REIT’s subsidiary operating partnership, to acquire the St. Regis Aspen Resort, a full-service, 179-key luxury hotel at the base of Aspen Mountain in the Rocky Mountains.”
  • Well that’s another way to ‘crowd source’ / syndicate funds.


Topdown Charts – ChartBrief 182 – Bond Yield Outlook – Callum Thomas 1/24

  • “There has been a lot of talk lately about trendlines, key levels and breakouts by some of the big names… Ray Dalio, Jeffrey Gundlach, Bill Gross.  But anyway, you don’t need to be a famous hedge fund manager to see the writing slowly showing up on the wall here across the major global sovereign bond markets.  The charts below show US and German 10-year bond yields have already broken out, and Japan/UK are getting close.”

WSJ – Daily Shot: US 3 Month LIBOR Rate 1/24


Bloomberg – Coincheck Says It Lost Crypto Coins Valued at About $400 Million – Yuji Nakamura and Andrea Tan 1/26

Environment / Science

Yale News – 2018 Environmental Performance Index: Air quality top public health threat 1/23


Reuters – Mexico’s drug cartels, now hooked on fuel, cripple the country’s refineries – Gabriel Stargardter 1/24

Puerto Rico

NYT – Hurricane-Torn Puerto Rico Says It Can’t Pay Any of Its Debts for 5 Years – Patricia Mazzei and Mary Williams Walsh 1/24

  • “The devastation wrought by Hurricane Maria has made Puerto Rico’s already dire financial situation even worse: The island’s leaders acknowledged late Wednesday that they will not be able to pay down any portion of their more than $70 billion debt for the next five years because of the damage.”
  • “Just before the hurricane, Puerto Rico had made plans to pay creditors a total of $3.6 billion through 2022. That was a fraction of the amount due, had the island, a United States territory, not gone into default.”
  • “Now, Puerto Rico expects its budget to be $3.4 billion in the red this year — a deficit that will take five years to close — because of the storm’s toll.”
  • “Nearly a third of customers remain without electricity, more than four months after the storm.”
  • “The government projects its population will shrink by 19.4% over the next five years, with a total exodus of over 600,000 people.”


January 8, 2018


Visual Capitalist – Visualizing the Global Millionaire Population – Jeff Desjardins 1/4

Worthy Insights / Opinion Pieces / Advice

Bloomberg Gadfly – A French Challenge to Gundlach’s ‘Disaster’ Bond Theory – Mark Gilbert 11/17/17

  • “A record month for inflows into corporate bonds is ‘setting up a disaster for when rates rise & `investors’ learn that, yes, these bonds have rate risk’ was yesterday’s latest tweeted warning from Jeffrey Gundlach.”
  • “French utility Veolia Environnement SA is one of a handful of low-rated borrowers—assessed at BBB or lower by Standard & Poor’s—with fixed-rate debt repayable in three years or longer that trades at yields below zero in euros.”
  • “Veolia already has three-year paper that trades at a negative yield. Those bonds, however, were sold in 2005 at a yield of almost 4.5%; they dipped below zero for the first time last year, and recently turned negative once more.”
  • “But on Thursday, Veolia went one better by pulling off the neat trick of persuading investors to pay it directly to borrow, selling 500 million euros of bonds repayable in three years at a negative yield of 0.026%—’a first for a BBB issuer,’ the company trumpeted in a press release. What’s more, the sale was oversubscribed by more than four times.”
  • “Now, you could view the sale one of two ways. For the optimists, it provides evidence that investors are awash with cash and still confident that the European Central Bank’s bond-buying program will continue to support the market.”
  • “If, like Gundlach, though, you’re concerned that the world of fixed-income is in for a rude awakening and that the stress will first show up in the corporate bond market, you’ll probably view it as a last hurrah before reality hits home with a vengeance.”

FT – Iran and the oil price – Nick Butler 1/2

  • “Increasing oil exports would be an obvious way to fund more public spending.”

FT – Watch 10-year Treasury yields for signs of danger in 2018 – John Authers 12/29

  • “Investors should stay in stocks as a big bear market looks unlikely as early as 2018.”

Mauldin Economics – Outside the Box: Et Voila – Grant Williams 1/3

NYT – How Do You Vote? 50 Million Google Images Give a Clue – Steve Lohr 12/31

  • The more our world becomes ‘codified,’ the more insights will be derived, the less privacy we will have, and the more predictive the models will become…

WSJ – The Limits of Amazon – Christopher Mims 1/1

  • “The tech giant is very good at delivering what customers need, but is it as well positioned to sell them things they want?”

WSJ – Bitcoin Isn’t a Currency, It’s a Commodity – Price It That Way – Nathaniel Taplin 1/3

Real Estate

Housing Wire – Value of U.S. housing market climbs to record $31.8 trillion – Kelsey Ramirez 12/29

  • “The total value of all homes in the U.S. increased in 2017 to a total $31.8 trillion, according to the latest report from Zillow.”
  • “This is up from last year’s record high of $29.6 trillion, data from 2016 shows.”
  • “This is so high, that total homes in Los Angeles and New York City metro areas are worth $2.7 trillion and $2.6 trillion, respectively, the size of the U.K. and French economies.”
  • “This is an increase of $1.95 trillion over the past year, more than all of Canada’s GDP or two companies the size of Apple, Zillow’s report showed.”
  • “And renters are also now spending more money than ever before on housing, spending a record $485.6 billion in 2017. This is an increase of $4.9 billion from 2016.”
  • Renting in San Francisco is especially expensive as renters collectively paid $616 million more than renters in Chicago, despite having 467,000 fewer renters in San Francisco.
  • “Of the 35 largest U.S. markets, most home value growth occurred in Columbus, Ohio, which saw an increase of 15.1% to $152.3 billion in 2017.”

WSJ – You Got Priced Out of … Philadelphia? The Spread of Hot Housing Markets – Scott Calvert and Laura Kusisto 1/3

  • “The gentrification of the Fishtown neighborhood here looks like something city planners dream of, with developers renovating old row houses as young professionals, along with new restaurants and businesses, pile in.”
  • “But home prices have shot up so quickly in recent years that the latest wave of young professionals say they are having a hard time making the finances work.”
  • “Now several Philadelphia City Council members want to pass a law requiring property developers to set aside 10% of new projects as below-market units, to improve overall affordability in a city that once was among America’s biggest bargains.”
  • “Soaring housing costs aren’t confined to New York or San Francisco. Cities including Pittsburgh, Detroit, Buffalo and Nashville all have explored or adopted policies that, like Philadelphia’s, seek to create more cheap housing by an approach known as inclusionary zoning.”
  • “’It really underscores the housing-affordability problem is much more widespread than simply a problem in the 10 most expensive coastal cities,’ said Stockton Williams, executive director of the Terwilliger Center for Housing at the Urban Land Institute in Washington, D.C.”

WSJ – Private-Equity Funds Focused on Property Raising Less Capital – Peter Grant and Shefali Anand 1/4

  • “Private-equity funds that focus on real estate have been raising less money for the past few years, and chances are dim that there will be much pickup in fundraising in 2018.”
  • “But the reason for this trend isn’t that pension funds, endowments and other institutions that invest in private equity have lost their appetite for commercial property. A big part of the slowdown is that private-equity funds haven’t been able to spend all of the money they have raised, according to investors, analysts and fund managers.”
  • “The declining pace of fundraising and spending is partly due to the old age of the current real-estate cycle. Prices started rising in 2009 and remain near record levels in many cities, including San Francisco and New York, making it trickier to make new investments.”
  • “This is especially true for the most aggressive opportunistic private-equity funds that typically try to produce returns of at least 20%. Fundraising by these funds has fallen particularly sharply, dropping to $33.5 billion as of Dec. 27, compared with $43.8 billion in 2016 and $63.7 billion in 2015, Preqin said.”
  • “Still, the large amount of unspent cash sitting in the vaults of private-equity funds has been comforting to investors who are concerned the markets are due for a steep correction. As long as demand for property stays strong, prices are likely to remain healthy.”
  • “Green Street Advisors says that there was $136 billion of buying power sitting with private-equity firms and real-estate investment trusts at the end of 2017. That compares with about $120 billion at the end of 2016 and less than $80 billion at the end of 2011.”
  • “Another trend that some expect to accelerate in 2018: investors who buy stakes in real-estate fund managers. Dyal Capital Partners, which raises money to buy minority equity stakes in alternative asset managers, in 2016 purchased an interest in Starwood Capital Group.”
  • “Park Hill is seeing a number of large foreign investors who invest in real estate express an interest in buying into managers, Mr. Stark said. They are saying: ‘Rather than investing through some third-party manager, why don’t we buy into a manager,’ he said. ‘If you have enough capital you can leverage the talent and buy the machine, not just pay to rent one’.”

WSJ – Peak Commercial Real-Estate Prices Force Investors to Get Creative – Peter Grant and Shefali Anand 1/2


FT – Private equity turns to early loans to boost returns – Henny Sender 12/31

  • “Borrowed money improves fund rating on key metric of results over time but is risky.”

FT – How high-frequency trading hit a speed bump – Gregory Meyer, Nicole Bullock, and Joe Rennison 1/1

  • “Smaller volumes and a fall in market volatility have dented business – so much so that some are quitting.”


FT – China steps up capital controls with overseas withdrawal cap – Charles Clover and Tom Mitchell 12/31

  • Under the guise of preventing money laundering and terrorist financing, “China’s authorities have capped overseas withdrawals using Chinese bank cards at Rmb100,000 per year.”
  • “China has sought to limit foreign exchange purchases by its citizens in an effort to conserve forex reserves. The new measure plugs one of the few remaining ways Chinese citizens get money out of the country by broadening the Rmb100,000 ($15,400) limit from a single account to a single individual.”
  • “Previously, the annual limit of Rmb100,000 for overseas withdrawals was set for a single bank card.”
  • “An annual purchase limit of $50,000 worth of foreign currency per person remained unchanged, said the State Administration of Foreign Exchange (SAFE) in a statement on Saturday.”
  • “A regional currency analyst said that the move appeared to be a tightening of capital controls. ‘I was not expecting this since outflows have been slowing. But by doing this it clearly shows China’s desire to manage the outflows more aggressively, particularly on individual flows’ he said.” 
  • In other words, if you happen to make or to have made a meaningful amount of money in China, don’t plan on taking it home. It’s like a casino, the house always wins if you play long enough – especially, if you’re not allowed to leave the table with your chips.
  • The follow up question: will U.S. companies with meaningful overseas cash balances be allowed to repatriate funds in 2018 now that the U.S. tax laws have changed?

FT – Dalian Wanda to slim down ecommerce unit as it refocuses on core – Emily Feng 1/2

NYT – China Offers Tax Incentives to Persuade U.S. Companies to Stay – Sui-Lee Wee 12/28


FT – Japan Inc: a corporate culture on trial after scandals – Peter Wells and Leo Lewis 1/2

  • “Public admissions by some of the country’s greatest companies reveal deeper problems in how they are run.”

South America

WSJ – Cash-Strapped Venezuela Offers to Pay for Medicines With Diamonds – Kejal Vyas 1/4

  • “With hospital shelves bare and the government stumped on how to settle $5 billion in arrears to pharmaceutical companies, cash-strapped Venezuela recently offered some foreign suppliers alternative compensation: diamonds, gold and coltan, the rare metal used to make cellphones and Playstations.”
  • “While it isn’t clear if any of the companies accepted it, the proposal underscores how Venezuela’s economic collapse is forcing President Nicolás Maduro’s embattled administration to improvise to pay for goods as severe dollar shortages push the country toward a barter society.”
  • “Bartering is also creeping into daily street transactions for staples, partly because the government is too broke to print enough currency. The so-called Strong Bolivar, which the government created in 2008 by lopping three zeros off its previous currency, lost 97% of its value in 2017 alone as the oil-rich country plunges further into hyperinflation.
  • “Using commodities as payment isn’t uncommon for large global companies trading in mining or oil, but is almost unheard of as a way to settle debts to other sectors like pharmaceuticals, according to Caracas-based economic consultant Orlando Ochoa.”
  • “Given the country’s opaque finances, it isn’t clear how much Venezuela holds in certified precious metals and stones.”
  • “As for the Health Ministry’s proposal to pharmaceutical suppliers, ‘It feels like a bluff,’ Mr. Ochoa said. ‘It’s as if they want to show off their assets to give the illusion that there’s still an intention of paying even though they can’t pay’.”
  • “Lower crude prices and nearly two decades of profligate public spending have left Venezuela’s economy—once Latin America’s most prosperous—in tatters. Gross domestic product shrunk by more than 16.5% in 2016, according to the government, and there is scant evidence of improvement in 2017. The International Monetary Fund estimates inflation will top 2,000% in 2018. The government has defaulted on more than $700 million in bonds in recent months, spurring drastic cuts in imports that have resulted in chronic shortages of food and medicine.”
  • “Tito López, head of Venezuela’s Pharmaceutical Industry Chamber, says because companies in his sector haven’t received payments from the government in more than a year, 95% of medications that were available three years ago aren’t now. Antibiotics and treatments for chronic illnesses like hypertension and diabetes are among those hardest to find.”
  • In the past pharmaceutical companies operating in Venezuela have considered accepting bonds or even oil as payment, but the government has never followed through, Mr. López said. ‘What we’re missing is a serious system that actually guarantees payments,’ he added.”

November 16, 2017

If you were only to read one thing…

FT – S&P says Venezuela is in default on sovereign debt – Edward White and Hudson Lockett 11/13

  • “Standard & Poor’s has declared that Venezuela is in default after it missed two interest payments and following a meeting in Caracas that left investors with little notion of how a default on its $60bn debt pile can be avoided.”
  • “S&P, which is the first rating agency to say the country is in default, said on Tuesday that Caracas had failed to make $200m in coupon payments for global bonds due in 2019 and 2024 within the 30-calendar-day grace period.”
  • “The agency said it had downgraded the issue ratings on those bonds to D from CC and cut the country’s long-term foreign currency sovereign credit rating to selective default, or SD, from CC.”
  • “’Our CreditWatch negative reflects our opinion that there is a one-in-two chance that Venezuela could default again within the next three months,’ said S&P.”


Bloomberg – Trump Is Shattering His Own Tweet Records – Brandon Kochkodin 11/13

FT – India’s Ambanis top Asia family rich list – Kiran Stacey 11/14

WSJ – Daily Shot: Credit Suisse – Global Wealth Report 11-14

Worthy Insights / Opinion Pieces / Advice

Bloomberg – Yale’s Swensen Sees Low Volatility as ‘Profoundly Troubling’ – Janet Lorin and Christine Harper 11/14

Bloomberg Businessweek – The Global Economy Looks Good for 2018 (Unless Somebody Does Something Dumb) – Peter Coy 11/2

Markets / Economy

WSJ – AB InBev Switches U.S. Boss as  It Struggles With Sales Slump – Jennifer Maloney 11/13

CNBC – Millennials lose taste for dining out, get blamed for puzzling restaurant trend – Patti Domm 11/14

WSJ – Small IPOs Are Dying. That’s Good – James Mackintosh 11/13

Real Estate

Investment News – Cole Capital, once part of a company coveted by Nicholas Schorsch, is being sold – Bruce Kelly 11/13


iea – World Energy Outlook 2017 – Global shifts in the energy system 11/14


WSJ – Daily Shot: Bitcoin 11/13

  • “Bitcoin has bounced off the lows but remains volatile.”


FT – Sweden’s big banks call an end to decades-long housing boom – Martin Arnold and Richard Milne 11/13

  • “Sweden’s decades-long housing market boom is over, two of the country’s bank bosses admit, while trying to reassure investors that their institutions will not suffer a painful hangover of defaults even if the cheap mortgage-fueled party is finished.”
  • “Swedish house prices have been red hot, rising almost 6% a year on average since 2007, while a surge in household indebtedness from 1.2 to 1.6 times disposable income has attracted intense scrutiny from regulators.”
  • “Swedish house prices fell 1.5% in September, the first decline for several years, reflecting the impact of measures introduced by regulators to constrain riskier mortgage lending as well as a recent increase in the supply of new homes.”


WSJ – Daily Shot: Bank of Japan Balance Sheet as % of GDP 11/14

South America

FT – Russia agrees to restructure $3.2bn of Venezuelan debt held by Moscow – Henry Foy 11/15

WSJ – The Class of 1994, Venezuela’s Golden Generation, Is Fleeing the Country – Ryan Dube 11/14

  • More than “…two million…Venezuelans…have left the country since 1999, the year Mr. Chavez gained power, according to Tomas Paez, a Venezuelan immigration expert. That exodus is roughly twice the number who fled Cuba in the two decades after the revolution there, and is set to worsen.”

WSJ – Default in Venezuela: What’s Next – Julie Wernau 11/14

  • “Venezuela has been falling behind on debt payments in its prolonged economic crisis. Some payments have come late. Others haven’t arrived at all. The South American country has said it wants to restructure its remaining debt, which analysts put as high as $150 billion. But observers say Venezuela’s debt crisis could be one of the most complicated in history.”
  • “Cash-strapped Venezuela and its state oil company, Petróleos de Venezuela SA, have been putting off making interest payments on their debt, taking advantage of 30-day grace periods to save money.”

FT – Venezuela: what happens now after official default – Robin Wigglesworth 11/14

  • “The most likely outcome, investors and analysts say, is a protracted period of financial limbo with a restructuring precluded by US sanctions and Venezuela facing a barrage of lawsuits that will tie it up for years to come.”

August 9, 2017


Howmuch.net – The Richest Person in Every State 2017 – Raul 8/7

Bloomberg Businessweek – Japan’s Doomsday Preppers Are Buying $19,000 Bomb Shelters – Justin Mattingly 7/25

Worthy Insights / Opinion Pieces / Advice

Bloomberg – Gundlach, Wary of Pricey Market, Sets Cap on DoubleLine Size – Erik Schatzker 8/7

Real Estate

WSJ – Daily Shot: Goldman Sachs – Notable Announced Retail Store Closures 2017 8/8


FT – Beijing hails success in battle against capital flight – Gabriel Wildau 8/7

  • “China’s capital flow turned positive in the first half of 2017, a reversal from unprecedented outflows during the previous two years that sparked worries over financial stability.”
  • “Data released on Monday indicate that Beijing’s support for the renminbi and a crackdown on foreign deal making and other outflow channels have largely succeeded in curtailing capital flight.”
  • “China ran a $16bn surplus over the first half of this year, excluding central bank intervention, compared with a $417bn deficit in 2016, balance of payments data showed. The figures also showed that China added to its foreign exchange reserves on a valuation-adjusted basis in the second quarter for the first time since early 2014.”
  • “‘Hot money’ — short-term money movements viewed as a gauge of investor sentiment toward Chinese assets — continues to flow out of the country, albeit more slowly, according to FT estimates based on official data.”
  • “Hot money outflow was $126bn in the first half on a net basis, well behind the $891bn full-year pace for 2016. The FT uses a broad definition of the term, treating all money flows not related to goods trade or foreign direct investment as hot money.”
  • “That suggests investors are eager to take money out of China if they can skirt capital controls, despite recent tightening. Indeed, a Reuters poll of 60 forex analysts in late July showed that they expect the renminbi to erase most of this year’s gains over the next 12 months.”
  • “In a sign that the government remains vigilant despite the improvements, regulators have imposed new measures in recent weeks to prevent capital flight.”
  • “Last week, the foreign exchange regulator named and shamed nine banks for violating forex rules. The agency is also requiring lenders to issue daily reports on all foreign bank card purchases by customers worth more than Rmb1,000 ($149) beginning later this month.”

WSJ – China Gives Up Global Role for a Stronger Yuan – Nathaniel Taplin 8/7

  • “The yuan, which as recently as 2015 had overtaken the Japanese yen as the fourth most popular currency for global payments, now clocks in at No. 6, according to international-transaction service provider Swift, below the Canadian dollar and barely above the Swiss franc. Only 1.98% of international payments tracked by Swift were yuan-denominated in June 2017, down from 2.09% two years ago.”
  • “Given the scale of the bleeding in 2015 and 2016, China’s leaders likely had little choice but to close the drawbridge.”