Tag: US House Prices

Population Projections and the US Housing Divergence

WSJ – Daily Shot: Pew Research – World Population Projections in 2100 07/30/19

Bloomberg – America’s Housing Affordability Crisis Spreads to the Heartland – Prashant Gopal, Reade Pickert, and Noah Buhayar 7/29/19

Low mortgage rates and thriving employment should be the recipe for a strong housing market. Instead, they’re deepening America’s affordability crisis.

What began on the coasts, in areas like New York and San Francisco, is now radiating into the nation’s heartland, as well as to cities from Las Vegas to Charleston, South Carolina. Entry-level buyers are scrambling to purchase homes that are in short supply, sending values soaring.

Expectations that the Federal Reserve will reduce interest rates this week will do little to change the sober reality: For many, prices have risen much faster than incomes, pushing homeownership out of reach for a new generation of hopeful buyers. That’s cooling the market, with the 2019 spring season shaping up as the slowest for sales in five years, according to CoreLogic Inc.

“All signs point to a housing market that should be doing really well and it’s not,” said Danielle Hale, chief economist for Realtor.com. “The No. 1 constraint, despite low mortgage rates, is that people can’t find housing that they feel is affordable.”

Recent months have shown a growing divergence between the high and low ends of the U.S. market. Prices in the bottom third jumped about 9% in June from a year earlier, compared with 1.1% growth for the top third, data from Redfin show. Meanwhile, sales for lower-priced homes plunged almost 20% as buyers struggled to find properties in their range, according to Zillow.

There are some signs of a pickup in the market. Contracts to buy previously owned homes rose 2.8% in June from the previous month, exceeding economists’ forecasts, the National Association of Realtors reported Tuesday.

Still, the outlook is particularly bleak for first-time buyers. The number of new homeowners created in the second quarter was the lowest since 2006, and just a third as many as a year earlier, the Census Bureau reported last week. Black homeownership fell to the lowest level since at least 1970.

The housing recovery that began in 2012 has been unequal from the start. About 6 million Americans lost homes in last decade’s crash and needed time to rebuild their credit. Private equity firms such as Blackstone Group Inc. swept in to buy foreclosed properties at deep discounts and rented them back to many of those displaced former homeowners.

Now those people are back in the market, along with the bulging population of millennials eager for their first crack at homeownership. But many of the properties they want have already been picked over. Builders have focused on wealthier buyers willing to pay bigger price tags, and now some areas have too many expensive homes, and not enough where they’re needed.

Affordable homes disappeared first in technology and financial hubs like Silicon Valley and New York, where buyers with big paychecks pushed up prices. Now values are flattening after many would-be homeowners have been forced to the sidelines. In some areas, demand has also been hit by a pullback in foreign buyers and new federal limits on property-tax deductions – as well as fears that a recession may be around the corner.

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May 7, 2018

Perspective

Economist – Remittances 4/26

Visual Capitalist – A World of Languages – Iman Ghosh 5/5

WP – America is more diverse than ever – but still segregated – Aaron Williams and Armand Emamdjomeh 5/2

Worthy Insights / Opinion Pieces / Advice

A  Wealth of Common Sense – Schrodinger’s Portfolio – Ben Carlson 4/29

Bloomberg – The Return of the Brick-and-Mortar Store – Conor Sen 5/1

Economist – In China’s cities, young people with rural ties are angry 5/3

Economist – Behind the teacher strikes that have roiled five states 5/3

Economist – Where will the next crisis occur? – Buttonwood 5/3

Mauldin Economics – Us vs. Them – Ian Bremmer 4/25

Pragmatic Capitalism – Three Things I Think I Think – China, Tesla And Weird Stuff – Cullen Roche 5/4

Markets / Economy

FT – Argentina stuns markets as it pushes interest rates to 40% – Cat Rutter Pooley, Adam Samson, and Roger Blitz 5/4

NYT – A Fast-Food Problem: Where Have All the Teenagers Gone? – Rachel Abrams and Robert Gebeloff 5/3

WSJ – Apple Allays iPhone Worries, Adds $100 Billion to Buyback Plans – Tripp Mickle 5/1

  • I count $300 billion in total dividends since 2013…geez.

  • If that wasn’t enough…

Real Estate

BI – Uber and Lyft are changing where rich people buy homes – Sarah Jacobs 5/3

  • “A report released this week from MetLife Inc.’s asset-management business confirmed that the premium cost of apartments near public transit has begun to decline due to services such as Uber and Lyft.”

FT – Priced out of the American dream – Sam Fleming 5/2

Health / Medicine

Bloomberg Businessweek – Silicon Valley Wants to Cash In on Fasting – Tom Giles and Selina Wang 4/24

Automotive

FT – UK to ban most hybrid cars, including Prius, from 2040 – Peter Campbell and Jim Pickard 5/4

  • Nothing formalized at this moment, just be aware of the direction of this effort.
  • “Hybrid cars that rely on traditional engines, such as the Toyota Prius, would be banned by 2040 under clean-air plans being drawn up by the UK government that would outlaw up to 98% of the vehicles currently on the road.”
  • “Three people involved in the decision-making process said the proposed rules would limit new car sales to those that can travel at least 50 miles using only electric power.”
  • “The change would outlaw more than 98% of the vehicles currently sold in Britain and require manufacturers to switch to vehicles predominantly driven by batteries — though they might be able to have petrol engines for back-up or support.”

South America

FT – Venezuela’s oil decline reaches new depths – John Paul Rathbone 4/30

  • “In addition to hyperinflation and a $70bn bond default that has cut off the country from fresh finance, the drop in oil production to 30-year lows has slashed government revenues, making it ever harder for Mr Maduro’s regime to import basic necessities and deploy the patronage he needs to maintain military and political support.”
  • “Caracas has also alienated key allies such as Beijing. Chinese state banks, which extended over $60bn in oil-backed loans between 2007 and 2016, last year made no fresh loans. A two-year grace period on a remaining $19bn debt to China expired last week, Reuters reported, meaning that Venezuelan export revenues will fall further.”