May 9, 2018

Perspective

WSJ – Daily Shot: OECD – Levels of Working Poor by Country 5/8

Worthy Insights / Opinion Pieces / Advice

A Wealth of Common Sense – Bad Advice Can Be Expensive – Ben Carlson 5/6

Bloomberg Businessweek – The Future of News – John Micklethwait 5/3

  • “…is journalism really in such a parlous state? Look closer. News is an industry in transition, not in decline. It is reemerging as something more digital, more personalized, more automated, more paid for—and (eventually) less fake. In many ways history is repeating itself, with the main surprise being the survival of so many established names. And good journalism still does have the power to change lives.”
  • “In a world where the facts are known, commentary will become ever more important…”
  • “That points to the final series of changes: the multiplicity of formats. The standard print news story is being broken up, split among explainers, videographics, podcasts, and so on. Editorship is increasingly a matter of choosing the best way to deliver information to a time-starved consumer. News is likely to get shorter, quicker, and more graphical. But if you need to understand Syria or cryptocurrencies, you may save time reading one long story in Businessweek or the New Yorker rather than endless small ones.”
  • “The newspaper has not so much died as transmuted. News is in a state of transition—and what’s emerging is molded by both new technology and old verities. As journalists, we have to work harder to keep our audiences. But I’m still optimistic—not least about fake news. It won’t go away; it never has. But it will play a smaller role. And the big winner will be you, the consumer. Even if you have to pay a little more for it.”

Economist – So long, farewell – Buttonwood 5/8

The Registry – Does WeWork at All? – John McNellis 5/8

Visual Capitalist – Interactive: Comparing Asian Powers to the U.S. (Lowy Institute) – Jeff Desjardins 5/8

Markets / Economy

FT – Walmart takes on Amazon in India with Flipkart deal – Simon Mundy and Arash Massoudi 5/8

  • “US retailer to pay $15bn for 75% stake in India’s largest ecommerce group.”

FT – Retail: Is the beauty industry ‘Amazon-proof’? – Anna Nicolaou and Aimee Keane 5/6

WSJ – Daily Shot: LPL Research – Length of Economic Expansions 5/8

Real Estate

WSJ – Daily Shot: Green Street Advisors – US Commercial Property Price Index 5/8

Energy

WSJ – Oil Costs How Much? How the Oil Rally Took Forecasters by Surprise – Alison Sider and Georgi Kantchev 5/6

Finance

WSJ – Daily Shot: Bianco Research – State Muni Yields vs. S&P Muni Index 5/8

WSJ – Pension Funds Still Making Promises They Probably Can’t Keep – Heather Gillers 5/8

  • “Retirement plans across the country still project their investments will grow at a median rate of 7.25%, according to Wilshire Consulting, an adviser to pension funds. Yearly returns on public pension plans have returned a median 6.79% over the past decade and 6.49% over the past 20 years, according to Wilshire Trust Universe Comparison Service, a database.”
  • “Unlike corporations, public pensions have wide latitude in projecting investment returns.”
  • “Public retirement systems had an average 72% of assets they need to pay for retirement promises in 2016, according to the latest data available in the Public Plans Database, which tracks about 170 pension funds. The figure a decade earlier was 85%.”
  • “Companies don’t have the same flexibility to set return expectations on their pension plans. Pension plans sponsored by S&P 1500 companies have an average 87% of assets needed to cover their pensions promises, according to Mercer, a consultancy.”

Agriculture

WSJ – Scientist in China Race to Edit Crop Genes, Sowing Unease in U.S. – Jacob Bunge and Lucy Craymer 5/6

Construction

WSJ – Daily Shot: CME Lumber (Jul) 5/7

Education

Axios – The disappearing Chinese student visa – Stef W. Kight 5/6

China

Bloomberg Businessweek – The $94 Billion Mystery: What Will Be Left of HNA’s Empire? – Matthew Campbell and Prudence Ho 5/3

  • “An annual report released in late April revealed that HNA spent more on interest than any nonfinancial company in Asia last year, a $5 billion bill that represented a more than 50% increase from the year before.”
  • “Overall debt rose 21% in 2017, according to the report, with short-term borrowing climbing by 25%, to about $30.3 billion. Total debt amounted to about 20 times HNA’s earnings before interest and taxes…”
  • “Nonetheless, HNA, which Chen co-founded in the 1990s, counting George Soros among its early investors, isn’t at risk of immediate catastrophe. At the start of 2018, according to people familiar with the matter, it told creditors it would sell about $16 billion in assets in the first half to lighten its balance sheet. Happily for the banks that financed its rise, HNA is already nearing that goal, thanks largely to the Hilton sale ($8.5bn).”

FT – Chinese group with $7bn in debt seeks Beijing bailout – Gabriel Wildau 5/7

  • “In a test of Chinese authorities’ commitment to reducing financial risk, a large Chinese manufacturing group has begged for a government bailout to avoid default on up to $7bn in debt after a regional lender withdrew loans.”
  • “Over the past year, China has tightened credit in a bid to tackle an explosion of corporate debt that the International Monetary Fund has called ‘dangerous’. But the plea highlights how painful Beijing’s deleveraging campaign has been for some indebted groups.” 
  • “According to Caixin, a respected Chinese financial news website, the crisis involving DunAn began when Zheshang Bank, a regional lender in Zhejiang, demanded early repayment of loans, causing other banks to restrict lending to the group.” 
  • “DunAn employs 29,000 workers and manufactures a range of equipment including air-conditioning parts, civil explosives and wind power equipment. It has also expanded into asset management and real estate.” 
  • “Government bailouts are most common for state-owned companies, but officials have also rescued private groups when their potential collapse raised the prospect of contagion.” 
  • “The Shanghai government shielded investors from losses on bonds from privately owned Chaori Solar, whose 2014 default was the first in China’s domestic bond market.” 

 

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